December 20, 2014

You Tell Us: How Has the Economy Changed Your Mobile Life?

You can’t turn on the televsion or hit a news site without hearing how bad things are right now.  Pretty much everyone is affected in some way or another.  We want to ask you – How has the economy changed your mobile life, if at all?

Have you dropped your data plan?  Did you scale back your text messaging package, opting to try email more often?  Did you end up buying a less expensive phone, with fewer features?

Let us know in the comments below.



  • Chris

    Laid off from an IT job 6 months ago.
    Reduced cable package down to basic cable just to keep broadband access.
    Dropped t-mobile data plan and changed unlimited text messages to a 400 txt/mo plan.
    Didn’t get the G1 but kept my outdated TMO MDA phone.

  • http://androidsupportforum.com Baltimore Steve

    I bought a Nokia 6301 off eBay when I needed a new phone. My contract is up in January with T-Mobile. So I’m waiting until then or later to get the maximum discount. I’ll probably wait for the second generation G1 to come out so the bugs are worked out. I also don’t like being forced to pay for a data plan I don’t need based on the phone I buy. So Android phones will likely wait until they remove this requirement. The economy makes you think twice before you commit to a new expensive contract. People in Europe get free G1’s without committing to a contract. Why are they screwing us?

  • chris

    so far not at all. i do however live in Michigan and work for a semiconductor company that supply’s all the auto company’s. im ok now but 6 months from now is up in the air.

  • http://www.daverea.com Dave

    I work for GM, so the wife and I have pretty much cut out any big purchases… I was going to buy a Kogan Agora and put it on one of AT&T’s data-only plans (my voice service is with Verizon, along with my whole family, so we use the “in” calling a lot!) but as long as the company stays in a cash crisis, I’ll be holding onto as much cash as I can.

  • http://eggtea.com Tony

    I lost my job so I had to stop my data plan for my G1 & then I realised that the G1 kinda sucks with out a data plan. Most of the good apps at this point require some kind of data. I used to listen to Imeem while I biked across town. Now I have to use my ipod touch again. :]

  • joe.attaboy

    I’m fortunate that I’m an IT contractor in the defense community. The downside is that to make enough to support the lifestyle to which I’ve become accustomed, I have to work far from home (home is northeast Florida, work is in DC/NoVa). Not much has really changed for me economically, and I recently dumped by Blackberry Pearl (purchased on eBay this spring) for a G1. My t-Mo contract is up this month and since I didn’t want to commit again, I did a full price purchase (though I did save $25 buying it at Wal-Mart). As others have mentioned, the G1 without data is almost a high-priced brick, but I have no reason to change my current plan.

    The G1 has made my life a bit easier in one way. Before, I would drag my laptop back and forth for my once- or twice-monthly visits home. With the phone able to do everything, that’s about 8 pounds of stuff I can shed from my carry-on. I’ve filled two 8 GB microSD card with music, so I no longer need the Sandisk mp3 player either. My wife likes the fact that I don’t spend as much time in front of the laptop when I’m home. When Momma’s happy, everyone’s happy.

    Frankly, the mobile life probably saves me money. Since I’m away from home so much, the “free” long distance charges is very helpful. Also, I speak to my wife more than anyone, and we have a family plan, so there’s no cost for the network-to-network calls. We have unlimited text on the plan ($20), which is a bargain because of my daughter’s tendency to text incessantly.This also allows me to keep the cost of the data plan a little lower.

    Although our incomes haven’t changed and gas is certainly cheaper, we’re watching our dollars, like everyone else. Frankly, I believe in the great economic strengths and opportunities of America, and I believe we’ll get through these times and soar once again. A lot of the economic issues in America today are self-inflicted, and our current political situation isn’t going to change things for the better any time soon. This is especially true since some of these clowns are directly responsible for much of the mess in the housing and banking markets to begin with. But that’s for another argument in another place.

    Frankly, I believe our ability to be mobile is what will make us strong now and in the future. We’re able to act on opportunities instantaneously because we have so much critical information available to us, right in our pockets. As tough as things are for some, I hope they realize how important it is to stay connected in anyway they can.

    In the meantime, my hopes and prayers go out to everyone who’s struggling. Hang in there, keep working hard, and look to the days ahead. We live in a great world and we have so much available to us, far more than those who came before us. Just remember, when things look bleakest, there’s just one way to go: up.

  • http://www.goldfishview.com David Shellabarger

    The bad economy made me slightly less likely to get a G1. Certainly isn’t not the only factor into me not getting a G1 but it was a contributing factor.
    Still waiting for a better Android phone…..

  • http://syabac.student.ipb.ac.id syabac

    everywhere,everytime connected to Internet.