December 19, 2014

Android Smart Phone App Generates and Scans QR Codes To Link Online Notes To Physical World

3banana launches QR Codes (Quick Response barcodes) for Android smart phone note taking app at Dow Jones Wireless Innovations 2009 Conference

3bananaegg_1a8c9San Francisco–(March 17, 2009)–Presenting at the Dow Jones Wireless Innovations 2009 conference today, 3banana Inc. launched the first Android note taking application enabling users to generate and scan QR Code (Quick Response barcode) directly on Android smart phones to link physical objects to mobile and online notes. Earlier this month, 3banana launched the first social note taking application for the Android smart phone, combining fast and efficient private note taking with the ability to share and discuss notes on the web and on the go. Now 3banana online notes and discussion threads can be connected to physical objects, from books to billboards to boxes in the garage.

The Dow Jones Wireless Innovations 2009 conference showcases future wireless and mobile technology and includes keynotes from top executives at RIM, T-Mobile, Virgin Mobile USA, Texas Instruments, and Myspace.com. The conference takes place on March 17 and 18, 2009, at the Sofitel San Francisco Bay in Redwood City, California. QR Codes are two dimensional barcodes designed for high speed scanning and decoding. QR Codes were created by Denso-Wave in Japan in 1994, and have gained popularity recently when Google began promoting the standard.

In presentations on March 17 at 11:55 AM and 12:55 PM, 3banana Inc. Cofounder and CEO Steve Brown unveiled a new release of 3banana Notes for the Android smart phone that can both generate and scan QR Codes on the phone to create notes or to pull up existing online notes and discussions about objects, places, or topics. Using the example of shared online wine tasting notes attached to a bottle of wine in the cellar or shared with a friend, Brown’s demonstration included the following steps:

  • Quickly creating a note by scanning a QR Code, taking a photo, or jotting down text on an Android smart phone.
  • Wirelessly synching Android notes to a 3banana online notebook to generate a unique private URL that can be shared.
  • Selectively sharing notes with friends to start an online discussion, i.e. book notes with a book club and wine notes with a wine group.
  • Easily generating a QR Code image associated with an online note and related discussion thread and labeling a physical object.
  • Automatically retrieving information on the Android smart phone by scanning the QR codes to pull up the note and discussion.

“Generating, scanning, and sharing information using personalized barcodes once was reserved for expensive systems used by large enterprises, like Fedex delivery people, or General Electric field service, or Kaiser Permanente hospital quality assurance,” commented Brown. “Now you can use QR Codes on those boxes in your garage, and share your notes with other members of your family so everyone knows what’s in there. You can label a book or a bottle of wine with QR Code so that when you share it with a friend you have invited them to a private online discussion group. You can even put a 3banana Notes QR Code into a Geocache to make the global outdoor treasure even more interesting. 3banana Notes for Android with QR codes is free, so your imagination is the only limit.”

“Sharing a QR Code image on your phone is also a great way to pass a note from one Android phone to another,” said Andreas Schobel, 3banana Cofounder and CTO. “You can generate QR code for a note on one Android phone, and then your friend can scan it in on another phone. When you share notes with your friends, the online conversation can evolve in fun and unpredictable ways. A book that once was collecting dust in the basement now can travel into the world as a catalyst for an ongoing online conversation that brings new ideas, people and experiences into your life.”

3banana Notes for Android stays synchronized wirelessly with the 3banana online service, where users can view and edit their private notes, share notes with friends, or comment on shared notes. In addition to photos and notes captured on their smart phones, online users also can keep track of web pages, documents, and videos, all organized and labeled inline — without the need for extra data entry fields or repetitive typing. Notes can be posted to popular social networks like Facebook and Twitter or shared on 3banana.com for a more private online discussion.

3banana Notes for Android is currently available as a free download in the Google Android App Market.

About 3banana

3banana Inc. creates smart phone and web applications that capture and share information effortlessly, wirelessly and securely. 3banana Notes are less work and easier to share than any other smart phone or online note taking application available today. Combining patent-pending innovations in semantics and social media sharing with fast, efficient and secure wireless information capture, 3banana mobile and web applications help people become more productive and more connected. For more information, please visit http://3banana.com.

3banana and the 3banana logo are trademarks of 3banana Inc. Android is a trademark of Google Inc. QR Code is a trademark of Denso-Wave, Inc.



  • thegirlinthecafe

    You know what really annoys me about this article? The fact that it is just copied over, full of so called sponsor links that are useless for the reader, and the only link interesting for the reader (yes to the 3bananas.com website) you haven't bothered to make into a link. That is lazy writing and very off putting.

  • AndroidGuys

    Updated the article to link out to 3bananas.com. As far as the sponsor links go, those are randomly generated.

  • thegirlinthecafe

    Thanks for your quick response. I still can't find the link to 3bananas.com but I am probably overlooking it! (Did you know you can link directly to the app in the market on cyrket.com? Might be very nice for your readers too)

  • Sean

    Someone told me about PhoneAppQuotes.com as a resource for getting cost estimates for an app that I’d like to develop. Do you think it’s a good idea?