December 18, 2014

Why Cyanogate Was an Epic Win for Android Fans

NoCyanogenI was waiting for something like this to pop.  It really was only a matter of time before Google decided to clamp down in some way on the whole modding scene.  While it was not a huge ban hammer like Apple does with jail-breaking on it’s platform, it certainly was enough to send out cries of dismay and objection from the masses.  The masses who love playing with the different ROM builds that are released, and many times give early access to very cool new features.

[quote]In most of the blog posts that I read, people were upset and negative about this clamp down, and I certainly understand why.  To be clear, Google has clarified their stance so we understand; they support working on the ROMs and releasing them, but do NOT support the bundling of any Google apps with those ROMs.  Whether you agree with this or not, I see this development as a good thing for the platform as a whole.

Now before you go blasting me out of the water with comments, think about it.  When someone tells you not to do something, what is your first instinct?  To do it!  We live in a culture that when something like this happens, people rush to check out what the big deal is.  They want to be part of the conversation and they want to be someone who has gotten their hands on the contraband in question.  And of course, they want the status of having it.  It is like the illicit videos that sweep the internet every so often.  The latest was the ESPN reporter key hole video, which was put to a torrent site.  The download rate was HUGE, because everyone wanted to see what the big deal was.

This is happening, I believe, with Android.  Those people who are tapped into the constantly shifting world of mobile devices have heard about Android and have never tapped into it. However, they are certainly doing so now, and finding a lot to like.  When a giant like Google seems to go against what they say the platform stands for–open source collaboration–it is going to attract attention.

Cyanogate could be a great thing for the platform as a whole.  I think it has really generated a lot of attention which will bring about new adopters.  The story was literally on every tech blog I came across.  Also, perhaps Google will continue it’s streak of making very good decisions, and hire a few people behind some of these custom ROMS.  If Google does that, watch out.  This thing is going to explode in a good way, it will show that they are committed to make Android be a great platform and continue to evolve to what the end users need.

Long Live Android!



  • Greg

    Google gave an open source operating system we can do everything with.
    Google created closed source application that run under this OS.
    Right ?

    Well, if you do not like the OS, you can changed it and install it on your phone, it's ok.
    But if you include proprietary applications inside it without its creators ' agreement, isn't normal that they are unhappy ?
    Do you mean that next time i give a tramp some money it will mean i have to give him my house ?

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/Michael_Martin Michael_Martin

    Interesting spin on it.

    I think Steve Kondik AKA Cyanogen handled the situation very well & tactfully.

    This will at least put some structure around the MODs as Cyanogen & Google have already resolved the matter to continue producing compliant MODs going forward.

    The key is making it simple easy and seamless – IMHO.

    ,Michael Martin
    GoogleAndBlog

  • Rdfry

    The problem is that google has some of the important apps bundled tightly to this phone.