July 24, 2014

The Android Army is Rising

In a humorous article from David Pogue of the New York Times, it seems that the “Android Army” is rising to meet any naysaying about the Nexus One or the Android platform with fanboyesque flames of their own.  It seems Pogue wrote a review of the Nexus One and pointed out a few of the flaws that he saw in the phone, and IMMEDIATELY started receiving feedback from people that did not paint him in a great light.

Here are the few of the quotes he got;

  • “It’s ridiculous that you dinged the N1 for not having a physical ringer switch. Millions of phones have no ringer switches and they manage just fine.”
  • “You are an idiot. You write that only 190 MB is available for holding apps, but I hear that Google is planning to fix that in software next year.”
  • “You write that the Nexus One doesn’t have a multi-touch screen, but it does; Google just didn’t enable it. You should be fired for your incompetence.”

Now I have read the initial article that Pogue wrote, and I actually found it to be a pretty positive review of the handset, simply pointing out some things that were missing from the handset that would have made it that much better.  So it does surprise me that he got these kinds of flames.  As I was reading the article, I was thinking to myself that these comments sound like they were coming from Apple fanboys, and I chuckled out loud when Pogue comes to the same conclusion.  I really did not see any reason for the hate he got, but Pogue goes on to talk about how he is hearing these same kinds of responses at CES 2010, and so are other tech writers.

“I’m at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas this week, and I found myself in conversation with editors from tech blogs Gizmodo, Engagdget and Gdgt. To my amazement, all three had noticed exactly the same thing: that the Android Army is amassing, and they don’t mince words.”, writes Pogue.

He goes on to speculate as to why the Android Army is so volatile,

“Popular theories: Maybe it’s because Google has just become an electronics maker for the first time.

Maybe it’s the Nook Effect: a product’s advance hype becomes so intense that when it finally arrives, and it’s a letdown, people feel betrayed and angry.

The most plausible theory, though, is that Google’s Android phone software is a more open and hackable operating system than the proprietary software on the iPhone, BlackBerry or Palm. Therefore, Android appeals to precisely the sort of frustrated, anti-establishment people who have no trouble writing abusive notes. It brings them out of the woodwork, gives them a new counterculture champion.”

I am not sure I agree with Pogue on any of his reasons for the Android Army, I think it more falls to the Underdog nature of the platform.  Since it’s launch, it has been seen as the alternative to the iPhone, and as such is seen as a Little Mac taking on Mike Tyson in the old Nintendo game, Punch-Out!.

Whatever the cause, it seems that the Android Army has been gaining soldiers, and those soldiers are loyal to a fault.  Long live Android!