October 24, 2014

T-Mobile and Qik bring video chatting up a level.

Video chatting and Front Facing Cameras are still relatively new, and it’s still unclear whether or not everyone wants it. This causes a problem for software makers who want everyone to use their software to get their chat on. Qik has been out for Android for awhile, first on the Evo and now in app form on anything. We know that Qik is working with companies to improve their use, the Galaxy Tab announcement included a partnership with Qik. Today, Qik announced another partnership, this time with T-Mobile’s Mytouch4G.

We all know that hardware accelerated software is better. When your phone can dedicate hardware to enhancing the user experience, everything runs better. Streaming video, camera frame-rate, anything that these mighty GPU’s we keep seeing will do faster and more powerful. It’s an exciting time, and one that Qik is taking full advantage of by using hardware acceleration to improve the quality of their video chat service. After all, if our phones can record 720p, should they be able to video chat the same? Obviously our front facing cameras aren’t capable of recording 720p yet, but the hardware support is there for using both cameras, and it paves the road for future devices.

On top of the hardware support, Qik offers features you can’t find anywhere else right now. For example, video voicemail, when you call and they don’t answer. I’m honestly surprised no one else has picked this up, but there it is. Also, your Qik  software is social, giving you the ability to save and publish the videos to your social drug of choice. Qik’s development team makes me happy, because they keep the features rolling, and they are constantly trying to innovate. It’s good to see developers keeping an eye on the state of the art, instead of the state of the market.