November 29, 2014

Google Installing Thousands of Special Cash- Register Systems for NFC Test

Google is rumored to be working with VeriFone Systems on a deal that will see thousands of special cash registers installed across major markets such as New York, Washington DC, and Chicago. These point of sale systems will be designed to handle mobile payments from devices that offer an NFC (near-field-communication) chip and could replace cash or credit cards. The Samsung Nexus S was the first Android phone to feature an NFC chip however that technology will slowly find itself becoming an industry standard.

The payment system test is slated to begin within four months but neither Google nor VeriFone are commenting on the subject.  One of the great things about NFC is the ability to layer data on top of itself, providing loyalty cards, instant coupons, and rewards credit all at once. One scan of the phone and not only will you have paid for that morning coffee but you’ll also have earned loyalty points and credit towards a reward from your bank.  Maybe even checking you into Facebook Places at the same time.


  • Dangerismymiddlename Com

    All that’s required to “layer data on top of itself” is a unique identifier. That’s all that will be stored on the target NFC devices.

    Think of how many places your EIN, or social security number, is used (if you are an employed US citizen). This works like that. The stores can use NFC in place of other cards, because you supplied your identifier to them, and authorized them to use it. This actually would not require you to remember your number, because they can simply read it off your Android computer, or your NFC-enable credit card, etc.

    I don’t know what Google chose for their identifiers, but if it were up-to-me I would choose an EAN-13 number, and another number to be used in place of the check digit. EAN-13 already has a check digit, but its algorithm does not handle every type of error well. (Its weak with transpositional errors for instance).

    NFC and RFID are very closely related. One really cool thing about them is that the target uses the source’s radio waves for induction, and that provides enough power to transmit the number back!

    Remember when Eric Schmidt said that the NFC chip was on the battery door of the demonstration phone? It is actually possible that the prototype phone’s target NFC chip be stored on a sticker that is placed on the battery door! What I don’t know is: can an existing part of our Android computers be re-purposed as an NFC source (I am guessing no way)? If so, then the technology could be retrofitted.

    Also, how easy is it going to be to create counterfeit NFC targets?

    • Dangerismymiddlename.com

      The website has a great description of EAN-13 (like a UPC code with an extra digit). You might be wondering how more than 10,000 items can be identified if there are only five product-code digits. Organizations can actually be assigned multiple manufacturer codes.

      • Dangerismymiddlename Com

        I don’t know what they will use as identifiers, and if I could, then I would delete all references to EAN-13 above, since that is just my opinion, and not worth mentioning.

        Which ID numbers to implement is apparently not in the NFC spec. Mobile phone IDs are only on mobile phones, so that might not be a good choice. Here is the link that I mentioned anyway (even though it’s not important): http://www.morovia.com/education/symbology/ean-13.asp

  • Dangerismymiddlename Com

    All that’s required to “layer data on top of itself” is a unique identifier. That’s all that will be stored on the target NFC devices.

    Think of how many places your EIN, or social security number, is used (if you are an employed US citizen). This works like that. The stores can use NFC in place of other cards, because you supplied your identifier to them, and authorized them to use it. This actually would not require you to remember your number, because they can simply read it off your Android computer, or your NFC-enable credit card, etc.

    I don’t know what Google chose for their identifiers, but if it were up-to-me I would choose an EAN-13 number, and another number to be used in place of the check digit. EAN-13 already has a check digit, but its algorithm does not handle every type of error well. (Its weak with transpositional errors for instance).

    NFC and RFID are very closely related. One really cool thing about them is that the target uses the source’s radio waves for induction, and that provides enough power to transmit the number back!

    Remember when Eric Schmidt said that the NFC chip was on the battery door of the demonstration phone? It is actually possible that the prototype phone’s target NFC chip be stored on a sticker that is placed on the battery door! What I don’t know is: can an existing part of our Android computers be re-purposed as an NFC source (I am guessing no way)? If so, then the technology could be retrofitted.

    Also, how easy is it going to be to create counterfeit NFC targets?

  • CD

    I future is looking bright for Blackhat Hackers.

    • CD

      Should read “The future”