April 20, 2014

Sprint confirms March 8 arrival for $99 Kyocera Torque

torque_bath_water

kyocera_torque

Sprint today announced that the rugged and life-proof Kyocera Torque will arrive on March 8 with a $99 price tag.  Previously outed in a separate announcement, the phone runs Android 4.1 and features military-grade specifications against water, weather, dust, and drops. In terms of hardware, the Torque features a 4.0-inch touch display, 5-megapixel rear camera, 1.3-megpixel front-facing camera, and 2500mAh battery. Look for the Kyocera phone in Sprint stores and online starting from March 8.

  • Waterproof whether sprayed or immersed in up to one meter of water for up to 30 minutes, Torque can handle all the rain, sprinklers, hoses, spit, drool, drinks, sinks or toilet water life can throw at it – that’s more than can be said of the around 82 million handsets in the U.S. that have already been destroyed by liquid.1
  • Extreme Temperatures of -22° to 140°F (-30° to 60°C) for a non-operating unit for two hours and -4° to 122°F (-20° to 50°C) for an operating unit for three hours – from backcountry snowboard trips to hikes in Death Valley, don’t sweat it.
  • Dropped 26 times from 4 feet high – or, the average week with kids at the playground.
  • Heavy dust for six hours – going off the grid while off-roading and camping will never be an issue.
  • Horizontal, vertical and sideways vibrations for one hour – that mountain bike ride or roller coaster will be no match for Torque.
  • Exposure to salt fog, for a complete 48 hour cycle; this cycle includes 24 hours exposure to salt fog followed by 24 hours drying time  – ideal for surfers, beach lovers or those who left their hearts and phones in San Francisco.
  • 95 percent humidity for 10 days straight – the phone can handle it, but its owners may not.
  • Solar radiation exposure of 1120 W/m2 for 24 hours – you might need sunscreen, but your phone doesn’t mind soaking up some rays.
  • Low pressure at 57.11 kPa/15,000 feet (4,572 meters) for two hours – higher than the tallest mountain peak in the lower 48 U.S. states.

Article Tags

Related Posts