August 2, 2014

Holofication Nation reimagines Android apps one at a time

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For every Android app or game that has been glossed up with the platform’s Holo design aesthetics there are countless titles that have not. And, while we generally like the stuff coming out of bigger development teams, sometimes a small unit is just as good – if not better. Such is the case with a small team known as Holofication Nation.

After starting out as a small Google+ community of just a few people early this year, there are now nearly 1,700 members and growing quickly. These guys (Connor Kirkby and Brandon D’Souza) have been slowly sexing up one Android app at a time and hopefully letting other developers know what’s possible.

Doing what the big companies cant seem to do properly, to make a decent app UI that fits in with the Android OS. These are modded official apps, given the holo touch.

No, this idea is not new and these guys are not the first people to create concepts. It’s just one particular group we feel might be worth rallying behind and another group of folks with which to familiarize yourself.

If anything, we like watching how these guys take an already existing Android app and dress it up in Holo. Some titles get a minor tweak here and there, others get a top-to-bottom overhaul. The community is hard at work with their own concepts and seem to be sharing quite a bit through Google+.

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In a sign of great things to come, the team has already created working versions of Instagram, Steam, Grooveshark, and Snapchat which employ the Holo principles. Note that you’ll need to uninstall the current, official copy of the app first. If you’re interested in seeing more apps with these standards and want to help, be sure to join the (private) community.

There is bit of “Wild West” feel to things right now as many of the newer members haven’t quite figured things out (don’t look for Facebook, system apps, etc) and seem to suggest every app gets a makeover. The community is set up quite well and works well, provided users read and follow instructions. Just know there’s a bit of noise-to-signal right now.