Project Fi gets crazy fast roaming speeds while the Nexus 6P gets a massive discount

Traveling abroad as an American comes with a choice: hop from hotspot to hotspot and hope you can get decent enough speeds to actually use your phone, buy a sim card in the country you’re traveling to and use the local network, or incur massive overages (unless you’re on T-Mobile).

Well, Project Fi is making life a little easier for its customers because Google is teaming up with another great service provider. Earlier this year we brought you news that Google teamed up with US Cellular to improve the network domestically, but now Google has announced that its teamed up with Three internationally to expand how and where you can use your phone abroad.

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Under the new deal, customers will now able to use Three’s network in 135+ destinations worldwide and it won’t cost you any more than using Fi’s service at home. That’s right, only $10 per GB.

Three covers huge destination countries like Ireland, the UK, Italy, France, and Australia, so chances are if you’re traveling this year, you’ll be covered. It is a nice (and surprising) trend that we see with carriers reaching agreements with their counterparts in other countries to provide cheap or even free service to roaming customers.

On T-Mobile, you get LTE speeds in the entirety of North America with free roaming in over 100 countries, while AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint are also entered into agreements that let their users connect to partner networks in North America.

Read More: It’s time to ditch the big four carriers and go with Google’s Project Fi (review)

To entice customers to sign up with Fi, Google is also offering $150 off a Nexus 6P if you sign up now. That’s an excellent deal on an excellent phone that many of us at AndroidGuys use as our daily driver.

You can check out Fi’s International Rates page to find out if your destination is covered under the agreement. Let us know down in the comments what you think of Google’s new move. Is Fi finally big enough to compete with the Big Four in the US?