Everything you need to know about T-Mobile ONE

We answer your questions about tethering, throttling, and more.

Today’s a big day in the world of smartphone rate plans. As you’ve likely heard, T-Mobile has shaken things up with its 12th iteration of its Un-carrier agenda. That’s right, the new T-Mobile ONE rate plan is here and it aims do away with data concerns altogether.

Indeed, the new stuff is fantastic and we couldn’t be happier for the changes. But, before you go running out the door to switch service providers, we figured we’d read through the fine print and spit out the details you need to know about T-Mobile One.

What is it?

In short, T-Mobile ONE is a single rate plan that includes unlimited talk, text, and 4G LTE data. Moreover, the plan includes all of the extra features that have been rolled out over the last few years, including unlimited text and data roaming and low flat-rate calling in more than 140 countries.

A single line will run $70 per month so long as you sign up for automatic monthly payments. Otherwise, it’s $75 per month. A second line is $50 per month (with AutoPay) with lines 3-8 costing $20 each per month. A family of three comes out to $140 per month with a four line account costing $160 a month.

Much like it did with its Video Freedom feature, video streaming is done at 480p which T-Mobile terms “DVD quality”. This means watching Netflix, Hulu, and other streaming services is not 720p, 1080p, or higher.

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Other Benefits?

All customers who take advantage of the T-Mobile ONE plan get the following:

  • Simple Global: unlimited text and data roaming and low flat-rate calling in 140+ countries
  • Mobile Without Borders: use your device in Mexico and Canada like you’re at home
  • Carrier Freedom: we help cover your switching costs
  • Wi-Fi Unleashed: coverage beyond the reach of cellular + 1 free hour of GoGo inflight Wi-Fi
  • Stock Up: become a T-Mobile shareholder and grow your share of T-Mobile by bringing friends
  • T-Mobile Tuesdays: get thanked with free stuff every week just for being a customer

When does it start?

The T-Mobile One rate plan takes effect starting on September 1.

Who is eligible?

At first, the T-Mobile One plan will be offered to all postpaid customers but prepaid subscribers will see something down the line.

Do I have to switch?

Customers can opt to stay in their current rate plan; T-Mobile will not switch anyone over to T-Mobile ONE against their will.

What about tablets and wearables?

Customers can add a tablet to their T-Mobile ONE plan for $20 per month, per tablet. A smartwatch and wearable can be added for $5 per month for 2G speeds. If a tablet is the only device on an account, it’s $70 for the unlimited 4G LTE. If a wearable is your only device, it’s $15 per month for 2G speeds.

What about tethering?

Things get interesting for T-Mobile One customers in the area of tethering. If you’re looking to tether your data connection, you may or may not be happy with the experience. While you do get unlimited tethering as part of the plan, it is only at 2G speeds. The idea, we suppose, is to have you add on a tablet for $20 per month and use the 4G LTE that way.

What if I want to tether at 4G LTE speeds?

Customers can add on 5GB of 4G LTE tethering for $15 at a pop. Those who want or need unlimited mobile hotspots can add the ONE Plus option for $25 per month.

What else can be added?

Other options include unlimited calling to landlines in 70+ countries and mobile numbers in 30 countries for $15 per month, per line.

If you’re looking for a higher definition video streaming, you can add it for $25 per month, per line. Doing so gives you the best available quality, including up to 4K streams. This is also included in the ONE Plus option. Note that video defaults to 480p each day, but users can toggle high-res video on at a moment’s notice.

What about throttling?

Worried that T-Mobile will dial down your speeds after say, 5GB or 10GB of data usage? Feat not, it sounds as if they’ll be pretty lax with things for the most part. According to T-Mobile, only a few of those customers (3%) who use the most data (26GB+) could see their data traffic prioritized behind others. What’s more, the slower speeds might only come at specific times and/or places.